The End of the Line

So this is it. The end of the line, so to speak. You know you’re at an outpost when the railroad lines come in perpendicular to the railway station vs along side of it. This is Kanyakumari, the southernmost point in India (at least, the mainland). It’s where the Bay of Bengal, the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea waters all mix together in a beautiful blue horizon. Giant waves roll in and crash among the rocks, sending white foam into the sky. Small sailboats dot the surface of the water as they catch the plentiful winds. Looking out towards the water, it’s a beautiful place.

The land is a bit less memorable. 

There’s the Gandhi memorial, which was my favorite. It was erected to house where a portion of his ashes were kept in the town before being released into the sea. It’s a peaceful, open structure, 79 feet tall for each year he was alive. Ind in the ceiling there is a circular hole, through which once a year on his birthday, the light streams directly on the inner memorial shrine.

There’s also the Vivekananda memorial rock and shrine, where one can take a ferry out to the rock where he meditated for several days.

And there’s the 133 foot high statue of Thiruvalluvar, an ancient Tamil poet. Built one foot for each chapter in his classic work, Thirukural.

Last but not least, the temple for the goddess for which the town was named. The Kumari Amman Temple, built for the virgin (kanya) princess (kumari) manifestation of Devi.

And sadly, a billion trinket stalls and more trash and pollution than you could pick up in a month.

Of course, I suppose in the states it would either be a beautiful national park (which I admit was how I pictured it before I got here), or in U.S. capitalist fashion, a trendy spot where one couldn’t visit the beach without spending a fortune in a swanky hotel.

So it is what it is, and I’ll share some of the pictures I took of the more beautiful aspects.

While I was here, I also visited the Padmanabhapuram Palace. Having admired Keralan architecture, I read about this place and knew I had to visit. It was totally worth a few hours on local buses.

The palace is a classic example of Keralan architecture and is actually a conglomeration of fourteen palaces, some dating back to the mid 16th century. Perhaps it’s the heavy use of wood, but it reminded me of older Japanese structures. Either way, it was a peaceful way to spend the morning.

Advertisements

Author: mettatsunami

Just another traveler in the world. Various musings as I visit Buddhist monasteries in the UK, then make my way around the world on an extended pilgrimmage.

10 thoughts on “The End of the Line”

  1. Your photos are lovely and thus you share the beauty of the scenery and the architecture, leaving the unpleasant undetected by your followers. Your words provide only a hint and we continue to enjoy your travels in India.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! The Keralan architecture is beautiful, and so unlike the architectural styles I associate with India. The next-to-last photo shows wood carving that almost could have come from Thailand. I guess this just illustrates the mixture of cultures in India. Thanks for the eye-opener!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Denise,

    Thanks for including me (so to speak) in your adventures. It was a wonderful armchair journey for me! I look forward to seeing you in Redwood Valley sometime in the not-too-distant future.

    With much loving-friendliness and every good wish for your happiness and safety during the remainder of your time away from home,

    Sondra

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s