Coonoor, continued

My sightseeing in Coonoor started off with the Highfield Tea Company. The HTC is on a plantation in Coonoor, and is open to the public. Tea was imported here to India by the English in the 1800’s so that they wouldn’t have to buy it from China, and could instead make the inhabitants of India grow it for them for a much cheaper price. Hmmm. 


The tea plant, Camelia sinensis, grows naturally as a tree when left to its own devices. It’s kept in shrub form (sort of like a bonsai) to make it easier to harvest the leaves. All teas, whether white, green, oolong, or black, come from the same variety of plant. The difference lies in the part of the plant that is used: the very central smallest part of the shoot for white, young lighter leaves for green, and older leaves for black. Oolong is made by oxidizing the leaves. The finer teas are sold as loose leaf, and the more inferior generally are sold for use as powder or in tea bags. Most of the masala chai in India is the latter version, processed by the CTC method: cutting, tearing, and crushing the leaves. Mixed with the right blend of spices though, it still makes some tasty tea.

Most of the tea produced in this region is bought by the big tea companies, but there is still available for local buyers, or tourists.


After the tea plantation, I visited some scenic lookouts and Sims park in the town of Coonoor. Lots of beautiful scenery, and nice quiet places to just sit and be.



Which was a good thing, because the next day I discovered what a Tatkal train reservation was. I had seen it at train stations and wondered. Now I know. A Tatkal ticket is a last-minute, day before the journey ticket for those of us who fail (or choose not to) plan. Here’s how it works:

One arrives the day before the journey at 0745 to get a numbered request for the ticket, elbowing the rest of the crowd for one’s place in line. But the ticket isn’t given then. Oh no. One has to return 2-3 hours later to actually buy the ticket, this time in an orderly queue by number. Don’t ask me why. But thankfully, the effort paid off, and I managed to get a ticket for the Nilgiri Mountain Railway on the downhill trip to Mettupulayam.

 The NMR is a famous narrow gage railway and is a UNESCO heritage site. It was featured in the Bollywood movie song “Chayya chayya“, in which the crew danced on top of the moving train. For more info on the railway, click here. Click on the title of the song for the YouTube video. For those who are curious, no, I didn’t see anyone dancing on the train. Just spectacular scenery. Enjoy.



Before I end this post, I’d like to give a hearty recommendation to the folks at Sun Valley Homestay. They’ve gone the extra mile to help me around as a solo traveler, the room has been great, and the food so incredible that it deserves its own future post. If you ever come to Coonoor, I would highly suggest staying here!

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Author: mettatsunami

Just another traveler in the world. Various musings as I visit Buddhist monasteries in the UK, then make my way around the world on an extended pilgrimmage.

6 thoughts on “Coonoor, continued”

  1. As much as you enjoy your tea, I am sure you must have enjoyed the Highfield Tea Company and the tea plantation. I can almost catch a scent of your favorite tea steeping.

    Liked by 1 person

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