In the land of scones and clotted cream

It’s been a busy week, but very enjoyable.

After leaving Amaravati, my friends took me to a celebratory birthday brunch, where I enjoyed a full English breakfast. Unlike, our typically sweet American breakfast, the English breakfast is more savory. A full breakfast consists of eggs, bacon, sausages, black pudding, roasted tomatoes, baked beans, sautéed mushrooms, and fried bread. And if you haven’t heard of it, black pudding is more like a sausage. Upon discovering the ingredients, one might say “yuck!”, but it’s actually very tasty. Really!

Not for vegetarians

On Monday Gricel and I went to London. She had a harp lesson, and while she was thus engaged, I spent nearly an hour in Tesco’s, a grocery store, marveling at all the unique foods that are here. Afterwards we stood in two separate queues for the London Eye, a giant Ferris wheel with glass “cages”, and a Thames River cruise. The time in queues (waiting in line) was probably longer than the time on the attractions, but worth doing once.


Tuesday was spent doing home projects at the house of Mark’s sister and brother-in-law, then back to Amaravati for the evening. His sister and BIL had gone on vacation, and I was able to get my dog fix by dog sitting until their appointed person could come a few days later. 

“And they call it…puppy love”🎶
Wednesday was spent walking along the canal in Berkhamstead, rewarded with giant scones and clotted cream. Unlike the triangular hockey pucks that are served at Starbucks, true scones are closer to what North Americans call “biscuits”, often with currants or other fruit. They’re best slathered with clotted cream (sort of somewhere between whipped cream and butter) and jam, but views vary widely.


On Thursday, we went out to Stratford on Avon to see Shakespeare’s home. On the way there, I enjoyed a trip down memory lane when we drove through my old stomping grounds of RAF Upper Heyford. I knew the base had been decommissioned, and would look very different, and it certainly did. The airfield is now a giant car park/storage, and many of the buildings have been torn dow and replaced by new houses. I stood in the new neighborhood where my old dormitory was and marveled at the change. There were still enough of the old buildings remaining to provide some nostalgia, and the place was nice to see. It feels like I was there in another life, as so many things have changed there and in my own life in the 30 plus years since I’ve been there. 

Today Gricel and I will head out to Chithurst Buddhist monastery to contemplate impermanence (and other things). I’ll leave you with more photos to enjoy until I get back online.


Tudor almshouses

Death by Shakespeare?
Seriously?
Not an “ugly duckling”!
What? Wait, where am I?

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Author: mettatsunami

Just another traveler in the world. Various musings as I visit Buddhist monasteries in the UK, then make my way around the world on an extended pilgrimmage.

9 thoughts on “In the land of scones and clotted cream”

  1. This has to be one of my favorites of the blogs you have written. Why? Because of the location, I think . . . Merry ole England. Love all the history, love all the photos, and can almost taste the scones and clotted cream!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ahhh…English breakfast and scones. Its such a good thing I don’t live there. My clothes wouldn’t fit after a month of eating all those wonderful things.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Another lovely collection of photos. It was fun to go to all these places together! And you ought to come back for a longer stay at Chithurst! Enjoy your Scotland and Ireland adventures and see you in little over a week. Love, love.

    Like

  4. I am seriously bummed I have been missing ALL of your blog posts until now. They have been going to my SOCIAL folder, darn it! But now I have found them!!

    Like

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